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Story Seychelles > Articles by: h@resort admin

Coastal Charms of Mahe Island: Experience the Seychelles Beaches

A View from Mahe Island, Seychelles

Mahe, the largest island in the country, is ringed with stunning Seychelles beaches, each offering a slice of paradise. The island’s coastline is a patchwork of bustling shorelines and hidden coves, all set against the backdrop of lush tropical greenery and the azure Indian Ocean. 

Sunset at Beau Vallon Beach in Seychelles

The Allure of Beau Vallon 

Starting with the island’s most famous beach, Beau Vallon, this northwestern stretch epitomises tropical bliss. It is the longest beach on the island and a hub of activity, where the calm waters invite swimmers and the steady winds attract watersport enthusiasts. With its vibrant beachside stalls and the mesmerizing Beau Vallon Bazar, it’s a beach that never sleeps and the only beach on the island that is swimmable all year round. On the coast of Beau Vallon is a luxury 5-star hotel Story Seychelles, that will make your stay more comfortable and unforgettable. 

Anse Royale Beach in Mahe, Seychelles

Anse Royale: The Serene Retreat 

 

Moving to the southeast, Anse Royale offers a serene escape. Protected by a vibrant coral reef, the waters are calm and perfect for snorkelling. The beach is dotted with quaint restaurants and provides a quieter alternative for those looking to relax away from the crowds. 

Anse Intendance Beach, Mahe Island, Seychelles

Intimate Coves: Anse Intendance & Petite Anse 

For those in search of seclusion, Anse Intendance and Petite Anse are the island’s best-kept secrets. These beaches offer hidden spots where the only sounds are the whisper of the palms and the rhythm of the waves. Their dramatic scenery and powdery sands make them ideal for a romantic getaway or a solitary day of reflection. 

Rocks at the Beach Side of Port Launay, Seychelles

Port Launay: A Marine Wonderland 

 

On the west coast, Port Launay boasts one of the island’s most beautiful marine parks. Enclosed by lush hills and clear waters, it’s a sanctuary for marine life and a haven for snorkelers and divers looking to explore the vibrant underwater world. 

Aerial View of Takamaka Beach, Mahe Island, Seychelles

Takamaka: The Picture-Perfect Postcard 

 

Named after the local Takamaka trees that dot its shores, this beach resembles a postcard. With its crystal-clear waters and fine white sands shaded by towering palms, Takamaka is a place where you can capture the perfect holiday snapshot or simply bask in the sun’s warm embrace. 

Sustainability and Preservation 

 

Mahe’s beaches are not only beautiful but also represent the islands’ dedication to environmental preservation. Efforts to maintain the pristine condition of the beaches are evident, with clear waters and clean sands being a testament to the island’s commitment to sustainable tourism. 

 

A beach experience in Mahe is not complete without tasting the local cuisine. Beachside restaurants offer a variety of dishes that incorporate fresh seafood and Creole flavours, allowing visitors to dine with spectacular views. 

 

Seychelles beaches on Mahe island are a symphony of nature’s finest offerings, from Beau Vallon’s lively shores to the tranquil corners of Anse Intendance. Each beach tells a story, and each wave sings a song of the island’s enchanting beauty. Whether you’re looking for adventure, romance, or peace, Mahe’s beaches provide a picturesque backdrop to an unforgettable Seychelles experience. When the day ends and the sun sets on this island paradise, it’s the memories of these shores that visitors will carry with them forever. 

Discovering the Majestic Morne Blanc Trail in Seychelles

Nestled in the heart of Mahé, the largest island of Seychelles, lies a hidden gem that beckons the adventurous soul – the Morne Blanc Trail. This enchanting hike is not just a journey through the lush, verdant landscapes of Seychelles but also an ascent into the clouds, offering breathtaking views and a refreshing escape from the tropical sun. Ideal for guests at Story Seychelles seeking to immerse themselves in the natural beauty of the island, the Morne Blanc Trail offers an unforgettable adventure. 

Nestled in the heart of Mahé, the largest island of Seychelles, lies a hidden gem that beckons the adventurous soul – the Morne Blanc Trail. This enchanting hike is not just a journey through the lush, verdant landscapes of Seychelles but also an ascent into the clouds, offering breathtaking views and a refreshing escape from the tropical sun. Ideal for guests at Story Seychelles seeking to immerse themselves in the natural beauty of the island, the Morne Blanc Trail offers an unforgettable adventure.

The Morne Blanc Trail is a testament to the natural wonders of Seychelles, taking hikers on a relatively short but steep journey through the misty forest of the Morne Seychellois National Park. Covering a distance of approximately 2 kilometers each way, the trail is well-marked and can be completed in about 1.5 to 2 hours, making it a perfect half-day excursion for nature lovers and adventure seekers alike. 

 

As you begin your ascent, the trail takes you through a dense forest of towering trees, ferns, and unique flora. The air is cooler here, filled with the sounds of bird calls and the rustle of leaves, creating an atmosphere of serenity and isolation from the outside world. The path, though steep in parts, is enveloped in the shade of the forest canopy, providing relief from the sun as you climb higher. 

 

The true reward of the Morne Blanc Trail lies at its summit, where hikers are greeted with a stunning panoramic view of the western side of Mahé. From this vantage point, the turquoise waters of the Indian Ocean stretch into the horizon, framed by the lush, green hills and the distant islands that dot the seascape. On clear days, the visibility is exceptional, offering photo opportunities that capture the essence of Seychelles’ breathtaking natural beauty. 

Breathtaking view from atop Morne Blanc Hiking trail in Mahe

The Morne Blanc Trail is not only a visual delight but also a haven for biodiversity. The forest is home to a variety of endemic plants and birds, including the rare Seychelles swiftlet and the Seychelles sunbird. The trail offers an excellent opportunity for birdwatching and discovering the unique plant life that thrives in this humid, tropical climate. 

 

For those staying at Story Seychelles and planning to embark on the Morne Blanc Trail, it’s important to come prepared. Wear comfortable hiking shoes, bring plenty of water, and don’t forget your camera. The trail can be slippery, especially after rain, so caution is advised. Early mornings are the best time to start your hike, as the views are often clearer and the temperature cooler. 

 

The Morne Blanc Trail is just one of the many outdoor adventures that Seychelles offers. Its proximity to Victoria, the capital city of Seychelles, makes it an easily accessible escape into nature. After your hike, you can explore the local markets, beautiful beaches, and delicious Creole cuisine that Mahé has to offer, rounding out a perfect day of adventure and cultural immersion. 

View of Mahe island in Seychelles from Morne Blanc

The Morne Blanc Trail is a must-visit for anyone seeking to explore the natural beauty of Seychelles beyond its pristine beaches. Its challenging yet rewarding path leads to some of the most spectacular views on Mahé, offering a unique perspective of the island’s diverse landscape. For guests at Story Seychelles, it represents an opportunity to connect with nature, experience the tranquility of the forest, and create memories that will last a lifetime. Whether you’re an avid hiker or simply looking for a breathtaking viewpoint, the Morne Blanc Trail promises an adventure that embodies the spirit of Seychelles. 

The Hidden Gem of Seychelles: Fond Ferdinand

Nestled amidst the lush, emerald embrace of Praslin Island lies a treasure not as widely known as the Vallée de Mai, yet equally enchanting and rich in natural beauty – Fond Ferdinand. This natural reserve, often overshadowed by its UNESCO World Heritage-listed cousin, offers a unique blend of biodiversity, breathtaking landscapes, and the serenity of untouched nature, making it a must-visit for anyone staying at Story Seychelles or exploring the archipelago’s natural wonders. 

Coco de Mer palm fruit, unique to Seychelles Islands

Fond Ferdinand, spanning over 122 hectares, is more than just a park; it’s a journey back in time to when the Seychelles islands were untouched by human influence. It was officially opened to the public in 2013, providing an alternative yet equally captivating experience to the Vallée de Mai. Fond Ferdinand is home to the iconic Coco de Mer palm, endemic to the Seychelles, and boasts a higher density of these magnificent trees than its more famous counterpart. 

 

The park offers a guided tour that takes approximately two hours, leading visitors through a well-maintained trail that winds through dense forest, home to a variety of endemic plants and animals. As you ascend, the canopy opens up to reveal stunning views of Praslin and its neighboring islands, offering a panorama that captures the essence of Seychelles’ natural beauty. The peak of the trail offers an unrivaled vantage point, where the azure ocean meets the sky in a horizon that stretches into infinity. 

Coco de Mer palm fruit, unique to Seychelles Islands

Fond Ferdinand is a biodiversity hotspot, providing habitat for a rich variety of flora and fauna. Apart from the Coco de Mer, visitors can marvel at a plethora of endemic species such as the Seychelles bulbul, the fruit pigeon, and the unique Seychelles chameleon. The reserve is also a haven for birdwatchers, with several species of rare birds making their home among the thick foliage. 

 

The reserve is not just a tourist attraction but also a center for conservation efforts aimed at preserving the unique ecosystem of the Seychelles. Fond Ferdinand is managed with a strong emphasis on ecological preservation and education, ensuring that visitors not only enjoy the natural beauty of the place but also understand the importance of conserving such unique environments for future generations. 

 

What sets Fond Ferdinand apart is its tranquility and the feeling of having stumbled upon a secret garden. The reserve receives fewer visitors than Vallée de Mai, allowing for a more intimate experience with nature. The guided tours are conducted by knowledgeable locals who share fascinating insights into the ecosystem and the cultural significance of the Coco de Mer, adding depth to the visitor experience. 

Fond Ferdinand is a biodiversity hotspot, providing habitat for a rich variety of flora and fauna. Apart from the Coco de Mer, visitors can marvel at a plethora of endemic species such as the Seychelles bulbul, the fruit pigeon, and the unique Seychelles chameleon. The reserve is also a haven for birdwatchers, with several species of rare birds making their home among the thick foliage. The reserve is not just a tourist attraction but also a center for conservation efforts aimed at preserving the unique ecosystem of the Seychelles. Fond Ferdinand is managed with a strong emphasis on ecological preservation and education, ensuring that visitors not only enjoy the natural beauty of the place but also understand the importance of conserving such unique environments for future generations. What sets Fond Ferdinand apart is its tranquility and the feeling of having stumbled upon a secret garden. The reserve receives fewer visitors than Vallée de Mai, allowing for a more intimate experience with nature. The guided tours are conducted by knowledgeable locals who share fascinating insights into the ecosystem and the cultural significance of the Coco de Mer, adding depth to the visitor experience.

Visitors to Story Seychelles should consider allocating a day to explore Fond Ferdinand. The reserve is open daily, and the entrance fee is modest, making it an accessible adventure for everyone. It’s advisable to wear comfortable walking shoes and bring water and sunscreen, as the trail can be warm and humid. Photography enthusiasts will find endless opportunities to capture the stunning landscapes and unique wildlife, so don’t forget your camera. 

Visitors to Story Seychelles should consider allocating a day to explore Fond Ferdinand. The reserve is open daily, and the entrance fee is modest, making it an accessible adventure for everyone. It's advisable to wear comfortable walking shoes and bring water and sunscreen, as the trail can be warm and humid. Photography enthusiasts will find endless opportunities to capture the stunning landscapes and unique wildlife, so don't forget your camera.

Fond Ferdinand is a testament to the Seychelles’ commitment to preserving its natural heritage. It offers visitors an unparalleled opportunity to immerse themselves in the pristine beauty of the islands, away from the more crowded tourist spots. Whether you’re a nature lover, a photography enthusiast, or simply seeking a moment of peace amidst breathtaking scenery, Fond Ferdinand promises an unforgettable adventure that will enrich your stay at Story Seychelles. It is a journey not just through the natural beauty of Seychelles but also an exploration of the delicate balance between conservation and appreciation of our natural world. 

Plantation House National Monument

Nestled amidst the lush beauty of Seychelles lies a historical gem, the Plantation House National Monument. This remarkable site offers a unique window into the rich and diverse history of the Seychelles, making it a must-visit for anyone intrigued by the islands’ past. In this blog, we delve into the fascinating world of the Plantation House Monument, exploring its history, architecture, and cultural significance.

Plantation House National Monument in Seychelles

History and Significance: The Plantation House National Monument stands as a testament to the colonial era of Seychelles. Constructed in the early 19th century on La Digue Island, it was originally the centerpiece of a prosperous plantation. Throughout the years, it has witnessed the evolution of the island’s society and economy, from the colonial period through to modern times. Today, it serves as a poignant reminder and educator of the island’s complex history, particularly its colonial past and the transition towards independence.

 

Architecture and Features: The architecture of Plantation House is a captivating blend of European and Creole styles, reflecting the multicultural heritage of Seychelles. The building is characterized by its elegant colonial design, featuring expansive verandas, high ceilings, and traditional Creole furnishings. The lush gardens surrounding the house add to its charm, hosting a variety of endemic and exotic flora, which further enhances the site’s historical ambiance.

History and Significance: The Plantation House National Monument stands as a testament to the colonial era of Seychelles. Constructed in the early 19th century on La Digue Island, it was originally the centerpiece of a prosperous plantation. Throughout the years, it has witnessed the evolution of the island's society and economy, from the colonial period through to modern times. Today, it serves as a poignant reminder and educator of the island's complex history, particularly its colonial past and the transition towards independence. Architecture and Features: The architecture of Plantation House is a captivating blend of European and Creole styles, reflecting the multicultural heritage of Seychelles. The building is characterized by its elegant colonial design, featuring expansive verandas, high ceilings, and traditional Creole furnishings. The lush gardens surrounding the house add to its charm, hosting a variety of endemic and exotic flora, which further enhances the site's historical ambiance.

Cultural Impact and Preservation: Over the years, Plantation House has evolved into more than just a historical structure; it’s become a symbol of Seychellois identity and resilience. Efforts have been made to preserve this monument not only as a relic of the past but as a living part of the nation’s cultural heritage. The site now serves as a venue for cultural events, educational programs, and as a repository of local history, playing a vital role in keeping the island’s heritage alive for future generations.

 

Visiting Plantation House: A visit to the Plantation House National Monument offers a unique opportunity to step back in time and experience the history of Seychelles firsthand. Visitors can explore the well-preserved rooms, each telling its own story, and stroll through the serene gardens. The monument also often hosts guided tours, providing deeper insights into the historical and cultural significance of the site.

Plantation House Museum on La Digue Island

The Plantation House National Monument is more than just a historical landmark; it is a journey through the rich tapestry of Seychelles’ history. Its walls whisper tales of the past, inviting visitors to uncover the secrets and stories that have shaped the island nation. A visit here is not just about exploring a monument; it’s about connecting with the soul of Seychelles.

The Best Time to Visit the Seychelles

A beautiful and secluded beach on Mahé Island, Seychelles

Wondering what the best time to visit the Seychelles is? Keep reading to discover everything you need to know about this magical island.
Nestled in the Indian Ocean, off the coast of Africa, the Seychelles archipelago is a pristine sanctuary of breathtaking beauty. Among the islands, Mahé stands out as a vibrant blend of natural wonders and cultural richness.
For an unforgettable stay, choose the exquisite Story Seychelles, where comfort and luxury blend seamlessly with the island’s natural beauty.

When to Visit: Timing Your Trip Perfectly

Green coconut resting on a wooden beam in Seychelles

The Seychelles enjoy a warm, tropical climate year-round, but certain times are more favorable for a visit depending on what you’re looking for.

 

  • April to May and October to November: These months are considered the best time to visit. They represent the transition periods between the hot and humid northwest trade winds (December to March) and the cooler southeast trade winds (May to September). During these transition months, the weather is relatively calm and warm, perfect for beach activities, swimming, and wildlife watching. The water is also exceptionally clear for snorkelling and diving.
  • December to March: This period is warmer and more humid, with occasional rainfall. It’s also the northwest monsoon season. Despite the rain, this is a popular time for visitors, especially around Christmas and New Year. The seas can be rougher, but the lush greenery and vibrant life on the islands are at their peak.
  • May to September: Cooler and drier, these months bring the southeast trade winds. This period is ideal for sailing and wind sports like windsurfing and kite surfing. While it’s generally less rainy, the sea can be a bit rough, making it less ideal for swimming.

 

Factors to Consider

 

  • Crowds: The busiest times in the Seychelles are around the December holidays and Easter. If you prefer a quieter visit, aim for the shoulder months like April, May, October, or November.
  • Wildlife: For nature enthusiasts, bird-watching is spectacular from April to October, and turtle nesting season is between October and February.
  • Cultural Events: Check the local calendar for festivals and events that might align with your visit, offering a deeper glimpse into Seychellois culture.
  • Budget: Prices can vary depending on the season. Peak seasons like December and January often see higher rates for accommodation and services.

 

Consider your interests and desired activities to determine the best time to visit the Seychelles. Tailoring your trip to align with your preferences ensures an experience that truly resonates with your expectations.

Reasons to Choose Seychelles for Your Wedding

Private pool area at Story Seychelles
  • Exceptional Location: Positioned on the beautiful Beau Vallon Beach, Story Seychelles offers stunning ocean views and direct access to one of the most famous beaches on the island.
  • Luxury Accommodations: The hotel boasts a range of accommodation options, from elegant rooms to expansive suites, each offering the utmost comfort and style.
  • Culinary Delights: With several restaurants and bars on-site, guests can indulge in a variety of culinary experiences, from local Creole dishes to international cuisine.
  • Unmatched Amenities: The resort provides a host of amenities, including a world-class spa, fitness centre, and an infinity pool overlooking the ocean, ensuring a relaxing and rejuvenating stay.
  • Eco-Conscious Luxury: Committed to sustainability, Story Seychelles integrates eco-friendly practices, allowing you to enjoy luxury while being mindful of the environment.

Exploring Mahé and Beyond

Tropical beach on Mahé Island, Seychelles
  • While staying at Story Seychelles, take the opportunity to explore Mahé. Visit the vibrant Victoria market, hike in the Morne Seychellois National Park, and discover hidden coves and beaches. For those looking to venture further, island-hopping to Praslin and La Digue is a must.

     

    Visiting the Seychelles during the ideal months and staying at Story Seychelles on Mahé Island offers an unmatched experience. Whether it’s lounging on sun-kissed beaches, exploring lush landscapes, or indulging in luxury, your Seychelles story will be one of unforgettable beauty and relaxation. Choose the best time to visit the Seychelles based on your needs and book your stay now!

Seychelles Wedding: A Tropical Paradise

A Seychelles Beach Wedding

When you imagine a dream wedding, does your mind immediately drift to pristine white beaches and crystal-clear blue waters of a Seychelles wedding?
The allure of the tropics is undeniable. The warm embrace of the sun, the soothing lull of the waves, and the symphony of chirping birds and rustling palm leaves create a mesmerising backdrop.

Seychelles: The Jewel of the Indian Ocean

Beau Vallon Bay on Seychelles

Seychelles, an archipelago of 115 islands in the Indian Ocean, is renowned for its postcard-perfect beaches, shimmering azure waters, and rich biodiversity.
Every island promises enchantment, making it a sought-after destination for couples looking to tie the knot.
Your wedding is not just a ceremony, it’s the beginning of an everlasting story.
And where better to commence this beautiful journey than in Beau Vallon Beach, one of the most beautiful beaches on the coast of Mahé Island where the luxurious Story Seychelles Resort is located.
With its meticulously curated wedding packages and pristine environment, it effortlessly transforms every wedding dream into reality.

Reasons to Choose Seychelles for Your Wedding

A Woman on the Beach Wearing a Wedding Dress

Mahé boasts over 60 stunning beaches. Beau Vallon is one of the most renowned, famous for its expansive sandy shore and clear waters, making it a hub for water sports and beach activities.
The lapping waves and the vibrant hues of sunset skies create an ambience that no man-made venue can replicate. As you pledge eternal love, the universe stands witness, making the moment infinitely more profound.
One of the advantages of a Beau Vallon wedding is the flexibility it offers. Whether you envision an intimate sunrise ceremony with just your loved ones or a grand sunset affair complete with local musicians and dancers, the beach adapts to your dreams.
Story Seychelles wedding planners with vast experience can guide you in tailoring every detail to your preference. Let’s delve into what makes Story Seychelles the ultimate wedding destination:

 

Diverse Packages Tailored to Your Needs

 

  • Amour Package (1,105€): Ideal for couples who desire a simple yet elegant celebration. From the thoughtful inclusion of a wedding coordinator to the romantic bed turn-down, every detail is meticulously taken care of.
  • Toujours Package (1,650€): This package elevates the experience with a 60-minute couple’s massage at the renowned Sesel Spa, a four-post bamboo arch, and aisle plinth flowers for the ceremony.
  • La Vie Package (2,445€): Designed for couples looking to share their special day with close ones. It accommodates the couple and up to 10 guests, ensuring an intimate and memorable affair with added luxury.

 

Capture Timeless Moments

 

Photography Packages:

  • Bronze Package: Ideal for those who want to capture the essence of the ceremony and the immediate joy that follows.
  • Silver Package: An extensive coverage that starts an hour before the ceremony, ensuring no moment goes unrecorded.


Videography Service:
Relive the day’s magic with a beautifully crafted love story video, capturing the most poignant moments of your celebration.

 

The hotel doesn’t just stop at the wedding. With world-class amenities, including the Sesel Spa, gourmet dining options, and exquisite suites, your stay promises to be as memorable as your wedding day. Including local elements, from the fruit basket in your room to the option of local flower arrangements, ensures that your wedding is infused with the authentic charm of Seychelles.

 

Let Story Seychelles be the backdrop to the beginning of your happily ever after.  From the moment you set foot on the property, sipping on your welcome sparkling wine, to the day-after breakfast in the serenity of your suite, every moment is designed to be unforgettable. So, why wait? Choosing a Seychelles wedding on Mahe Island is not just about selecting a venue, it’s about embracing a holistic experience.

Discover Seychelles Local Beverages: Takamaka Rum, Kalu, Seybrew, and Vanilla Tea

Fruit cocktail and glass of beer with a view of Indian Ocean and Praslin, Seychelles.

The Seychelles archipelago, a slice of paradise in the western Indian Ocean, offers not just breathtaking landscapes but also a diverse array of local beverages including Takamaka Rum, Kalu, Seybrew, and Vanilla Tea.

Takamaka Rum: A Historical Delight

Bottle of rum with lime ice and coconut

La Plaine St. André is the esteemed distillery where the iconic Takamaka Rum is crafted, encapsulating the rich history of Seychelles. This distillery, with its origins traced back to a plantation estate in 1792, has evolved over time, showing visitors a narrative of heritage, culture, and the art of rum-making. Visitors can meander through the museum, indulge in the scents of a medicinal garden, and even interact with the two majestic Giant Aldabra tortoises – Taka and Maka.

 

Rum, in its essence, is distilled from sugarcane or molasses and aged in barrels for varying periods, which gives it its distinct flavors and character. The process of fermentation, distillation, and aging has been honed over centuries, with origins in various parts of the world, making it a drink rich in history and diversity.

 

The Takamaka Rum, in particular, carries with it the unique taste of Seychelles, a hint of tropical notes with underlying sweetness, paired with the warmth and depth that only good aging can bring. It’s a mix of flavors that speak of the land from which it originates.

 

La Plaine St André, throughout its existence, has seen countless changes, from its days flourishing with crops of cinnamon and vanilla to its periods as an art gallery and eco museum. Today, in partnership with the Seychelles Heritage Foundation, the distillery continues its legacy, both preserving its storied past and welcoming the future, offering visitors a journey through time and taste.

Palm Wine: The Essence of Kalu in Seychelles Culture

Glass of Kalu, palm wine from the Seychelles

Palm wine, synonymous with the name ‘Kalu’ in Seychelles, is derived from the sap of coconut palm trees. Kalu has been deeply intertwined with the Seychelles way of life since the early days of settlement. Its importance is not just in its consumption but in the traditions it represents.

 

The term “Kalu” finds its roots in the Tamil word “Kallu,” signifying the freshly harvested, cloudy, and sweet juice. This sweet sap is carefully extracted from the unopened flower spike of the coconut palm. This spike, protected by a hard outer sheath, is the tree’s source of this delightful liquid. For the sap to flow, it may take anywhere between two to seven days. An adept Kalu collector knows precisely when to place his bamboo container to capture the essence of the tree. The health of the tree dictates how much sap can be tapped. If conditions are right, multiple unopened flower spikes from the same tree can be utilized, offering a sweet and refreshing drink initially.

 

The initial days after tapping bring forth the Kalu dou, a sweet variant of the drink, almost non-alcoholic and delightfully refreshing. However, as nature takes its course, fermentation starts, transforming the sweet Kalu dou into Kalu pike, slightly bubbly and tangy. As time progresses, within a 24-hour window, this effervescent drink morphs into a potent version with an alcohol content nearing 8%. Each stage of this transformation brings with it a unique flavor profile and experience, cherished and celebrated by the locals.

 

Traditionally, this beverage is savored in a setting called lakanbiz. Drawing its name from the French term ‘la cambuse’, a lakanbiz could be an open-air gathering or a sheltered shed. The owner of this establishment must have the requisite license to serve this age-old drink, ensuring that the traditions around Kalu are maintained. Kalu has been the centerpiece in various local events, from birth celebrations to funeral wakes, and it continues to play an essential role in Seychelles’ day-to-day life.

 

While other forms of alcohol might have taken precedence in recent times, the cultural and historical significance of Kalu remains undiminished. Its preparation, consumption, and the traditions surrounding it offer a glimpse into the heart of Seychelles.

SeyBrew: An Iconic Taste of the Seychelles

Two glasses of beer on the beach.

From the heart of the picturesque Seychelles archipelago emerges a beer that encapsulates the essence of the islands – SeyBrew. Since its inception in 1972, Seychelles Breweries has perfected this golden elixir, ensuring that each sip transports you to the pristine beaches and serene landscapes of the region.

 

Brought to life using world-class malt and hops sourced from renowned regions globally, SeyBrew benefits from a rich blend of ingredients. The brewing process is meticulously overseen, ensuring a consistent and refreshing taste profile, which has made SeyBrew the undisputed favorite beer of many in and beyond the archipelago.

 

SeyBrew, presents itself with a pristine pale gold hue, drawing immediate parallels with the sunlit beaches for which the region is celebrated.

 

The aroma of SeyBrew is a dominant blend of grassy and lemony fragrances, subtly hinting at the grainy elements that form its base. Diving into its taste, SeyBrew is an ensemble of well-balanced flavors. There’s a noticeable presence of a light melon tang which seamlessly integrates with its grassy foundation. The carbonation is finely calibrated, complementing the primary flavors and ensuring the drink remains refreshing. As one continues to savor the beer, it introduces a slight yeast note, and the taste experience is further brightened by an underlying citrus hint, reminiscent of a squeeze of fresh lemon.

 

SeyBrew’s broad appeal isn’t only due to its exceptional taste but also because it tells a story of local craftsmanship, a passion for brewing, and the beautiful land it hails from.

Vanilla Tea: Comfort in a Cup

A cup of vanilla tea.

Vanilla tea, particularly the SeyTé variety from Seychelles, is an indulgent blend that captures the essence of the islands’ rich flora and its culture. The vanilla variant stands tall among the flavors offered, given vanilla’s storied history in Seychelles, a place renowned for producing some of the world’s most exquisite vanilla pods.

 

The tea’s aroma fills any room with a warm, sweet scent that harks back to the tropical breeze of the Seychelles. Once steeped, the deep amber hue promises a taste that is both robust and delicate. The flavor of vanilla tea is a balance of robust tea leaves and the delicate, sweet undertones of vanilla. It is this nuanced flavor profile that makes SeyTé’s vanilla tea so unique. Each sip offers a brisk taste of the tea and transitions smoothly into the fragrant notes of pure vanilla, leaving a lasting impression on the palate.

 

What truly elevates this tea experience is the Seychellois tradition of adding evaporated or condensed milk. This practice, borne out of necessity in earlier times when fresh milk was scarce, has now become a beloved ritual. The milk adds a velvety richness to the tea, amplifying its natural sweetness and creamy texture. The result is a comforting brew that pairs wonderfully with pastries or light snacks, making it the centerpiece of many Seychellois gatherings.

 

Vanilla tea is proof of Seychellois ability to transform simple ingredients into something truly special. Curling up with a book on a rainy day or looking for a calming drink, SeyTé’s vanilla tea is the perfect companion, bringing a touch of tropical warmth and comfort to any moment.

Additional Beverages to Explore

Woman holding a drink on a tropical island.

While Takamaka Rum, Kalu, Seybrew, and Vanilla Tea remain the most popular, other local beverages like Bacca, made from sugarcane liquor, and Coco d’Amour, a coconut liqueur, are worth a try. Also, don’t miss out on other local beers like Eku.

 

In conclusion, the Seychelles provides not only breathtaking scenic beauty but also a diverse array of flavors and experiences. Whether you’re sipping on the iconic Takamaka Rum, indulging in the local Kalu, enjoying a chilled Seybrew, or relaxing with a cup of Vanilla Tea, this archipelago promises an unforgettable experience.

Exploring Paradise: Wondrous Things to Do in Seychelles

Stepping off the plane onto the enchanting islands of Seychelles, you are instantly engulfed by an air of serene tranquility and unspoiled natural beauty. The archipelago, nestled in the warm Indian Ocean, whispers of adventures both underwater and amidst lush, green peaks. When the quest for finding the best things to do in Seychelles begins, there’s no limit to the adventures and tranquility that await you.

A beautiful day in Seychelles

A Serene Start at Story Seychelles and Beau Vallon Beach

Amidst this Eden-like environment, find the elegant Story Seychelles, perfectly positioned on the renowned Beau Vallon Beach. Not only is this luxurious resort a haven of relaxation and indulgence, but it also serves as the optimal starting point for countless escapades across the islands, enabling visitors to weave their own story of exploration and luxury.

As your feet sink into the soft, white sands of Beau Vallon Beach, let the refreshing ocean breeze and gently lapping waves be the prologue to your story. With Story Seychelles being located on this iconic beach, opportunities for marine adventures are aplenty. Engage in scuba diving or snorkeling to immerse yourself in a vibrant underwater world where coral reefs, bustling with an array of colorful fish and sea creatures, extend an unmatched spectacle.

A tourist enjoying Scuba diving

Journey Through Ancient Valleys

Venturing inland, the natural allure of Seychelles continues to unfold. Take a journey through the UNESCO World Heritage Site, Vallée de Mai, where the rare Coco de Mer palms mystically tower overhead, and exotic birds serenade your trek through the ancient forest. Nature enthusiasts will revel in spotting the Seychelles black parrot, a species only found in this mesmerizing valley.

Entrance to the UNESCO protected Vallée de Mai in Seychelles

Seychellois Flavors

Cuisine, a pivotal chapter in any travel tale, takes you on a delectable adventure through the Seychellois palate. Experience authentic Creole dishes that are a delightful blend of flavors, encompassing French, Indian, and African influences. Be it a sophisticated dining venue or a quaint beachside shack, your culinary journey in Seychelles will serenade your taste buds with freshly caught seafood, aromatic spices, and exotic fruits.

Romancing in Paradise

For those who intertwine romance in their travel chronicles, Seychelles hosts some of the world’s most secluded and enchanting beaches, offering the perfect backdrop for moments of love and commitment. Exchange vows, renew them, or simply lose yourselves in the romantic ambiance that the islands naturally exude. Intimate beachside dinners, serene walks along the shoreline, and spectacular sunsets will etch everlasting memories into your love story.

A couple enjoying the romantic Seychelles ambience

Culturally rich and vibrantly alive, Seychellois festivals are another mesmerizing chapter of experiences. The Creole Festival, arguably one of the most anticipated events in Seychelles, invites you to dive deep into the heart of their traditions, with energetic dance, compelling music, and an eclectic display of arts and crafts. Being a part of such an event not only enlightens one about the Seychellois way of life but also embeds a piece of their vibrant culture into your journey.

Island-Hopping Adventures

The stunning array of islands, each with its own unique charm and secrets, invites exploration beyond the main islands. From the granitic wonders of La Digue, where time seemingly slows, to the coral atolls of the Outer Seychelles, a sanctuary for diverse wildlife, the narrative of exploration is boundless.

Every sunset witnessed on these heavenly islands gradually turns the page to a tranquil night under the starlit sky. Find your way back to Story Seychelles and let the soothing sounds of the ocean usher you into a peaceful night’s slumber. Reflect on the myriad of experiences lived, from thrilling adventures in the azure waters to the tranquility found amidst verdant landscapes and realize the treasure trove of stories that have become a part of you.

Remote Island in Seychelles

In the final chapter, as you sit in reflection of the myriad of adventures had and the serenity experienced, it becomes evident that the tapestry of things to do in Seychelles is interwoven with not just the physical experiences, but also the emotional and spiritual journeys undertaken.

In Seychelles, every moment spent exploring the islands, indulging in culinary delights, immersing in the vibrant culture, and creating memories at Story Seychelles, builds a story – your own unique story, which will be cherished and retold until your next visit to this paradisiacal destination.

So, let the enticing islands of Seychelles be the canvas, and Story Seychelles your luxurious abode, as you paint your own vibrant tale of exploration, romance, and serene escapades amidst the unparalleled beauty of this archipelagic gem.

Exploring the Stunning National Parks in Seychelles

When one thinks of Seychelles, images of pristine beaches, azure waters, and lush green landscapes come to mind. Beyond these mesmerizing visuals, the National Parks in Seychelles beckon with their unique biodiversity and natural wonders. Among the vast list of national parks of Seychelles, there are three terrestrial and six marine parks, all managed by the Seychelles National Environment Commission under the Department of the Environment. Today, we’ll dive into some of these prominent parks. 

Praslin National Park: A Bird Lover's Paradise

Situated on the island of Praslin in the Seychelles archipelago, the Praslin National Park and surrounding areas form an Important Bird Area (IBA) in the heart of the western Indian Ocean. 

 

Description:

Covering an impressive 700 ha, this IBA ranges from sea-level up to the island’s peak at 367 m. While it includes the 330 ha Praslin National Park, it also encompasses additional land towards the south-east. The site is renowned for its mixed secondary forest, which houses a significant proportion of native plants. In particular, the presence of all six endemic palm species of Seychelles stands out.  

Tourists walking through Vallée de Mai national parks in Seychelles.

Among its treasures is the World Heritage-listed Vallée de Mai, with its enchanting palm forest. The park’s natural beauty is further complemented by small streams and waterfalls, while its south-eastern part, characterized by boulders, caves, and scrub vegetation, offers a stark contrast. 

 

Fauna:
Bird enthusiasts will be thrilled to know that this IBA has been identified by BirdLife International due to the populations of various birds it supports. These include Seychelles kestrels, Seychelles blue pigeons, Seychelles swiftlets, Seychelles bulbuls, and Seychelles sunbirds. Besides these, the park is home to various endemic reptiles and amphibians such as the Seychelle Islands tree frog, six caecilians, four geckos, two skinks, and two snakes. The beaches serve as nesting grounds for hawksbill turtles while green turtles can be spotted feeding along the coast. The Seychelles fruit bat, a significant part of Praslin’s wildlife, also roosts within this IBA. 

Ramos National Park: Seychelles' Marine Beauty

A trip to Félicité island will introduce you to the Ramos National Park another one of National Parks in Seychelles. 

 

Description:
Spanning over two-thirds of Félicité island, the Ramos National Park lies within Seychelles’ Marine Protected Area (MPA). Established in 1983, it has been under the stewardship of the Seychelles National Parks Authority. 

Curieuse Marine National Park: A Reservoir of Biodiversity

The Enigmatic Curieuse Island
Tucked away in the pristine waters of Seychelles, Curieuse Island was declared the Curieuse Marine National Park in 1979, emphasizing the country’s commitment to conserving its unique biodiversity. Initially, between 1978 and 1982, conservationists embarked on a project to relocate the Aldabra giant tortoise from Aldabra to Curieuse. Today, the island boasts of over 300 Aldabra giant tortoises, making it a primary habitat for these gentle giants. 

 

Natural Splendors:
A journey to the southern part of the island reveals a sprawling mangrove swamp, made accessible for visitors through a dedicated walkway. Moreover, the island’s rich flora comprises coco de mer palms, towering takamaka trees, and several plant species native to Curieuse like Porcher, Bois Chandelle, Lalyann dile, Bwa bannann, and Bois Cassant de Bord Mer. 

 

Wildlife Haven: 

Seychelles black parrot in one of National parks in Seychelles.

Curieuse is home to numerous bird species, including the rare Seychelles black parrot, which, apart from Praslin, is found only on this island. However, it’s essential to note that although black parrots are spotted here, no breeding is known to occur. Hawksbill turtles also find a safe haven in this marine national park, establishing a significant rookery. 

Moreover, Seychelles branch of Global Vision International currently runs a satellite camp on the island. Their primary focus is on the conservation of the island and conducting surveys on local species, including fish, coral, turtles, and the coco de mer. 

Mahé Highlands: A Soaring Natural Retreat

Morne Seychelles National Park on Mahe Island.

Majestic Heights of Mahé
Positioned in the central and north-western region of Mahé island, the Mahé highlands and surrounding areas form a vital Important Bird Area (IBA) in the vast expanse of the western Indian Ocean. 

 

Description:
This IBA spreads across an area of 4600 ha, roughly 20% of the island. Its vast boundaries encompass the 3045 ha Morne Seychelles National Park, home to Morne Seychellois, Seychelles’ towering peak at 914 m. The park’s history is painted with extensive exploitation of the native forests, primarily for timber and cinnamon plantations during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Today, human activities, including forestry, tourism, and some tea cultivation, affect a mere 10% of this vast area. 

 

Flora and Fauna:
The steep terrains within the park are shrouded in dense secondary forest and shrub woodland. At elevations beyond 600 m, one can find remnants of primary forest, standing tall with few exotic intruders. This national treasure houses many endemic species. 

Outside the confines of the Morne Seychelles National Park, the IBA extends to the mountainous regions in the south-east, covering the districts of La Misère and Cascade. These areas blend natural beauty with human settlements, featuring orchards, tea plantations, roads, and infrastructure. 

BirdLife International recognizes this site for its rich birdlife, including Seychelles kestrels, Seychelles blue pigeons, Seychelles scops owls, and Seychelles sunbirds, among others. 

Silhouette Island Marine National Park

Situated about 20 km northwest of Mahé, Silhouette Island stands out as one of the richest biodiversity points in the western Indian Ocean. Boasting a myriad of endemic and threatened plant and animal species, this national park offers a chance to encounter nature at its finest. One of the notable species is the critically endangered Seychelles sheath-tailed bat, for which two roosting caves have been identified, revealing intricate passages and boulder fields. 

Interestingly, in 2005, another roost complex was unearthed, showcasing 32 of these bats. The island is also a paradise for flora enthusiasts. Out of the 75 or so endemic plants found in the granitic islands of Seychelles, the majority are located on Silhouette.  

A beach on Silhouette Island whose surrounding waters are a Marine National Park.

In a bid to preserve its biodiversity, the surrounding waters of Silhouette were declared a Marine National Park in 1987. A more expansive Silhouette National Park was established in 2010, safeguarding an impressive 93% of its landmass.  

The island’s significance doesn’t end there; it’s also an Important Bird Area and has been recognized by the Alliance for Zero Extinction as a pivotal site for the survival of Critically Endangered species. The dedicated Island Conservation Society manages the island’s preservation efforts. 

 

Geographical Wonders 

Silhouette Island, the third-largest granitic island in Seychelles, covers an area of 20.1 km2 and houses about 200 inhabitants. 

The island’s terrain is a sight to behold, marked by five towering peaks exceeding 500 m in elevation. Of these, Mont Dauban is the tallest, standing at 751 m. The picturesque landscape is accentuated by younger syenite formations, estimated to be 63 million years old. A unique feature is the surface volcanic ash located between Point Ramasse Tout and Point Zeng Zeng, the only one of its kind in Seychelles. 

Sainte Anne Marine National Park

View of beaches on one of the islands of Sainte Anne Marine National Park.

A mere 5 km away from Victoria, the bustling capital city of Seychelles, lies the enchanting Sainte Anne Marine National Park. This national park in Seychelles, envelops eight smaller islands, and has a rich history to its name. 

 

Historical Highlights 

Established in 1973, this marine park holds the honor of being the first of its kind in the Indian Ocean, aiming to conserve its diverse wildlife. Fishing and water-skiing activities are strictly prohibited to ensure minimal disruption to the delicate marine life.  

 

Tourist Attractions 

Today, these islands have metamorphosed into some of the Indian Ocean’s premier tourist destinations. Dive enthusiasts can explore the vibrant coral gardens, mingle with the colorful tropical fish, and even spot the majestic reef sharks. One can also witness one of Seychelles’ largest “seagrass meadows”. Local operators curate day-trip packages, offering a taste of everything the Marine Park has to offer. 

In totality, the land area of the Marine National Park’s islands amounts to 3.887 km², with the entire marine expanse covering 14.43 km². 

 

Conclusion: 

National Parks in Seychelles, both terrestrial and marine, embody the essence of the islands, a harmonious blend of mesmerizing landscapes and unrivaled biodiversity. Each park, from the bird-rich forests of Praslin to the marine sanctuaries like Ramos and Sainte Anne, holds a unique story, a testament to the country’s unwavering commitment to environmental preservation. While the beaches may draw many to Seychelles, it’s the heartbeats of these protected areas that truly encapsulate its soul. 

Scuba Diving Seychelles: A Dive into Paradise

People in diving gear prepared to go Scuba diving Seychelles.

Scuba diving Seychelles offers an unparalleled marine adventure. This idyllic archipelago in the Indian hides a realm of underwater wonders waiting to be explored. The islands, adorned with granite and coral formations, offer dive sites that cater to both novices and seasoned divers. The experience is unparalleled – from the thrill of swimming alongside sharks and rays to the serene joy of floating amidst corals, Seychelles offers it all. 

Marine Life to Witness:

Person scuba diving near sea turtle.

The Green and Hawksbill Turtles are a sight to behold. Green turtles, with their smooth carapace, are primarily herbivores, while the hawksbill turtles stand out with their pointed beak and beautifully patterned shell, predominantly feasting on sponges. Both species are regular nesters on Seychelles beaches. Bird Island, Aldabra Atoll, and Cousin Island are their favored nesting sites. For those eager to see them underwater, Silhouette Island and North Island are ideal diving locations. 

The diverse species of Reef Sharks in Seychelles are certainly fascinating and awe-inspiring. The Grey shark, with its torpedo-shaped body, is known for its agility in the water. The Silvertip, distinguishable by the white tips on its fins, is a bold species, often approaching divers with curiosity. The Hammerhead’s unique “hammer”-shaped head broadens its sensory range. And then there’s the Whale Shark, the ocean’s gentle giant and the largest fish in the sea, known for its majestic size and calm demeanor. For those keen to spot these magnificent creatures, the outer islands of Seychelles, especially around Aldabra Atoll and D’Arros Island, are the place to be. Furthermore, Whale sharks often make their graceful presence felt between August and November around Mahe, Praslin, and La Digue. 

Woman diver appreciates beautiful underwater scene.

The Seychelles waters are also home to an array of Vivid Species of Fish. The Lionfish, with its venomous spines and radiant stripes, captures immediate attention. The sleek and predatory Barracuda is another noteworthy mention, especially when they form schools. And the Giant Grouper, one of the most massive reef fish, isn’t shy and might even approach divers out of curiosity. These creatures can be witnessed around St. Pierre Island, Anse Lazio, and the Fisherman’s Cove Reef off Mahe. 

Lastly, the Majestic Manta Rays and Stingrays are the graceful dancers of the Seychelles marine world. Manta rays, with their vast wingspans, move with such elegance and are often seen doing somersaults as they feed on plankton. In contrast, stingrays, with their flatter bodies, prefer the ocean floor and can often be seen camouflaged in the sand. For encounters with them, Aldabra Atoll and D’Arros Island are prime spots for Manta rays, while the sandy terrains around Praslin and Mahe are perfect for spotting stingrays. 

Diving Hotspots: 

In the heart of the Indian Ocean, diving Seychelles presents a captivating underwater world waiting to be explored. One of the most fascinating spots is the Sunken Ship Dive. Here, divers can see the mysteries of intentionally sunken vessels, notably The Twin Barges and Aldebaran. These shipwrecks have become a hotspot for divers, though the depths, which plunge up to 40 meters, mean it’s a site more suited for advanced divers. 

Another great spot is L’ilot, a granite islet that illuminates the night with its coral-covered landscape, offering spectacular nocturnal dives. Those who dive here are met with an ethereal glow of marine life, making every dive feel like a dream. 

Baie Ternay Marine National Park, Seascape depicting the calm blue waters.

For divers who appreciate variety, the Baie Ternay Marine Park is a must-visit. This marine park is renowned for its distinctive underwater topography and the diverse fauna that inhabits it. From swaying corals to darting fish, it is a microcosm of the ocean’s wonders. 

Shark enthusiasts, meanwhile, often gravitate towards Brissare Rocks. Recognized as a hotspot, it promises close encounters with various species of sharks, ensuring an adrenaline-filled dive every time. In contrast, Chuckles Rocks offers a more calming experience. Here, the waters reveal a vibrant underwater landscape, with vivid corals and marine life that’s both mesmerizing and tranquil. 

Tropical Island of St. Pierre, perfect for scuba diving Seychelles.

For novices taking their first plunge, St Pierre is an ideal choice. The diving site offers not just gentle conditions but also an opportunity to witness turtles and reef sharks up close. White Bank is another spot perfect for beginners, characterized by its warm waters and outstanding visibility that allows even the most inexperienced divers to enjoy the underwater world without any hindrance. 

For seasoned divers seeking a challenge, South Marianne Island offers an unparalleled experience with its unique underwater landscape. However, due to its intricacies, it’s mainly recommended for those with advanced diving skills. Lastly, there’s Aldabra, a UNESCO World Heritage site. Diving here feels like stepping into another world, filled with endemic species found nowhere else on Earth. However, as a protected area, it requires special permissions for exploration. 

Choosing the Perfect Time: 

The Seychelles waters are consistently inviting due to their equatorial climate, ensuring that at any time of the year, divers are able to enjoy themselves. That said, each season introduces its distinct diving experience. 

From June to August, the south-east monsoon cools the water down to around 25°C. This drop in temperature, combined with the presence of plankton which might slightly compromise visibility, has an exciting advantage—it attracts the majestic whale sharks. This period offers divers the opportunity to see this sight that’s rare outside of these months. 

On the other hand, from November to May, diving conditions reach their zenith. Divers can enjoy the unparalleled clarity with visibility stretching up to 30 meters, bask in the warmth of the waters, and relax in the calm seas. It’s arguably the ideal time for anyone looking to explore the underwater wonders of Seychelles.  

However, a little heads up for those planning their trips between December and February: although the diving conditions remain excellent, occasional heavy rainfall might make an appearance, adding a different rhythm to the diving experience. 

Choose your preferred season and dive into the unparalleled beauty that diving Seychelles has to offer. 

Diving Tips:

Diver giving the OK sign.

Before embarking on your diving adventure in the Seychelles, it’s imperative to undertake some preliminary steps to ensure safety and a smooth experience.  

Start by researching and selecting a reputable diving school, one with certified instructors and glowing testimonials. While you might be eager to dive right in, it’s beneficial to brush up on your swimming skills beforehand, ensuring you’re confident and comfortable in the water. Once you’re geared up, always make it a habit to meticulously check your equipment before descending into the ocean’s depths. This includes being familiar with emergency protocols, particularly the vital process of regulator activation. Additionally, if you’re someone who’s prone to seasickness, it’s wise to take preventive measures in advance, allowing you to fully savor the enchanting marine world without any discomfort. 

For those considering a deep-sea adventure, remember that scuba diving Seychelles is a journey into a world teeming with life. As you resurface, you’re returning from one of Earth’s last unexplored paradises. Dive in and let the Seychelles’ underwater realm captivate you.